Workout Tryout - Burning A Record Number Of Calories At HIIT2Fit

HIIT2fit in Publika offers HIIT classes, but with a difference. We found out for ourselves— the hard way!

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Workout Tryout - HIIT2Fit
bryan ong

As all fitness enthusiasts know, HIIT (or High Intensity Interval Training as it’s less commonly referred to) isn’t a new concept. Heart rate tracking isn’t new either. But what’s novel is the bringing together of these two concepts in one package, and that’s exactly what SEA Games representatives, Wilson Lee and Chrissy Kha Khrang, have done with their boutique gym, HIIT2fit, located in Publika.

We paid a visit to HIIT2fit recently, expecting an intense workout, but underestimating it nonetheless. Lee talked us through the concept behind HIIT2fit. “We wanted a lifestyle concept that was also results-driven,” he said. “Plus, we find that a lot of people just work out blindly without knowing [whether] they’re working out in the right zones.” Seeing your heart respond to your activity is a great way to gain a better insight into the intensity of your workouts. It also allows you to see where you need to concentrate your efforts to get the type of results that you want to achieve. Lee adds: “You’ll have a more consistent training pattern [because you can see which zones you should be training in].”

HIIT2fit offers two class models: You’re either Lean, or you’re Mean. Not huge fans of bikes, we went with Mean, and boy, did it live up to its name. Lee gave us our heart rate monitors before handing us over to trainer Josh, who explained that the Mean class combines cardio and strength elements. He said that we’d be doing alternating four-minute strength and cardio circuits, with each exercise lasting one minute followed by a short rest period.

We won’t lie: It often felt like we were dying. But the upside? You will burn an insane number of calories.

Of the workouts, Lee added: “The intensity’s really short—it’s four minutes, and during those four minutes,you’ll be in zone 4, zone 5; [working at] your maximum heart rate for a minute or two. It builds your anaerobic system and this transfers to [any other sport that you might be doing].” It’s difficult to grasp unless you go through it yourself, but the workout allowed us to understand how this could improve our fitness in a short amount of time.

One of the best things about the workout (apart from the endorphin rush that hits you about 20 minutes after class has ended) is that your results are visible throughout the class and accessible to you even after you leave. In fact, Lee explains that your workout data is retrievable via the account that you register with before your first class. The results are personalised too—you plug in your particulars and the monitoring incorporates those into the tabulation of results.

There are several markers of fitness when looking at heart rate data, with the zones being the most obvious. HIIT2fit’s heart rate data is displayed as such—you can see the total time spent in each zone as well as the total number of calories burned and an Intensity score. “We generally target 140/150 and up. Anything above 170 is a grade A workout. 140-150 is A-,” Lee said.

So, the good news is, we all passed!

Lee explained that “fit people can drop their heart rate zones in about a minute,” adding that it means the heart needs less time to recover from activity. He has also noticed that the heart rate data shows that “a lot of
people feel tired, but don’t realise that they can actually push harder
. [Our system] quantifies the workouts [in a way that easily displays this information].” Call us masochists, but we’re thinking of heading back for another insane calorie burn.

Find out how you can join a HIIT2fit class!

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